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to medical marijn. taxation issues in california, two big tax issues. >> in many, many years. she was behind this. proposition 38. if if you only made $7,000 a year, she wanted your taxes to go up for 12 years to pay for educatio education. we are still waiting to get a more definitive answer there. guys back to you. >> and more on the tax issues in california. >> maria, this has been a huge issue here, because governor brown has said that if his tax hike didn't pass it would mean $6 billion in cuts to education that will happen almost immediately. we will have to see if he makes good on the threats. he says he has nowhere else to cut. if it does pass, it will make california's highest tax rate the highest in the land. millionaires will have to pay 13.3% state income taxes. it would raise the sales tax and raise anywhere from $35 billion to $50 billion over $100 million in lobbying on both sides went into this proposition. at the moment the state says with 17% of the precincts reporting it is trailing. we still have a long night ahead. >> basically part of the security detail just came along
from mississippi. caller: i am a retired firefighter from mississippi -- from california. disasters, and most jurisdictions find they are overwhelmed by the time of happens, because disasters over what every jurisdiction. whether you are in new york or mississippi, the jurisdictions in charge of tried to mitigate the problems are so overwhelmed, and most of them are victims themselves. we need a national fire disaster program that exist within the federal cover that. the resources are there with a going to a lot of expense. all disasters are similar to what would happen in a hotel. if everyone goes into a hotel, they see what to happen when a fire starts, how to get out. once they are out, they need to be accounted for, and you need to have in the emergency service that can come in and mitigate the problem. most jurisdictions do not have the resources to do this. when it comes to police and fire -- when it comes to things that have to do with police, we have the fbi that is a national organization that has the resources to do things that the local to restrictions, whether state or l
california, ron waiting to talk to us. caller: good morning. good job. the issues are occluded. the whole congress -- i blame the entire congress for holding americans hostage for this results. this is not space science. we're not trying to go to pluto. we are trying to fix something of a vote of 425 people we have to convince. this is ridiculous. the price of health care is doubling as a first of the year. that has nothing to do with the fiscal cliff. that is congress not paying attention to what's going on with health care. they are blaming obamacare on this, but this was before the election the price of health care was going up. across the board, we are not dealing with problems at hand. both sides of the aisle, those that don't want to give an answer to this before we go over the fiscal cliff, they're not responding to the will of the people. they will be voted out. there's no doubt. if we have some very lovely and caring republicans that are very conservative and we love them, but we will vote them out if they don't fix this. we are holding them responsible as we are holding the demo
.c. for a while, moved to california. i was married for a while in california and then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again, and now i'm about to get married again. [laughter] so, thank you. hopefully it's the same guy. don't forget that. [laughter] >> you don't get gifts every time he there. that's problem. so i did have this very, i certainly had a personal stake in that so i was very pleasantly surprised him outside and i do think also, i want to look at this deeper but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the power of voting and the actual voting wasn't as big as it was in the past which just the extent that people were saying different things, if that ever was true, it feels like in this race are polling suggested that was kind of the margin and we won by the margins that were fairly close to the polling and i think if that's true that's very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thinking. i think there was a tendency to feel that we had to really get very high numbers and so that was good news. >> that was let -- i was less confident about the racin
wasn't married, i lived in live in washington dc, i moved to california. i was married for a wild in california. then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again. now, i am about to be married again. [laughter] thank you. >> hopefully this same guy? [laughter] >> yes, we can't forget that. >> yes, you don't get gifts every time either. that's a problem. [laughter] so i did have this very -- i certainly had a personal stake in that. so i was very proud and 10 pleasantly surprised on that front. i also want to look at this deeper. but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the voting was not as big as it had been in the past. suggesting that people were saying different things. it feels like in this race, the polling suggested that that was kind of the margin and we won by a margin and we were fairly close to the polling. i think if that is true, it's very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thing. i think there was a tendency for us to feel that we really had to get very high numbers. so that was good news in my world. >> the staff said one thing,
, a democratic candidate to beat jonathan paton. in california, the democrat there beats tony strickland. michigan's first. the republican, benishek, co mes out the victor. there are a few other outstanding ones. go to our web site as we told you yesterday, the state of florida had yet to be called. here is the "miami herald." we still do not know where the 29 electoral votes will go, but it has not made a difference in the overall outcome of the presidential election. back to the topic of what was your message to washington. a lot of newspaper articles this morning about the fiscal cliff. that is what faces these leaders as they make their way back to washington. here is the fiscal -- "the financial times." topping that list is paul ryan, the vice-president candidate returning to congress and has asked to continue on as chairman of the house budget committee. those are the people doing the negotiations. moving on to "the washington post." they know earlier wednesday barack obama call john boehner and others to urge them to put aside partisan interests to advance the interest
member on the energy and commerce committee, the gentleman from california, mr. waxman. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california is recognized for five minutes. mr. waxman: thank you very much for yielding to me. mr. speaker, i rise in opposition to the bill. a warmer planet has less ice, higher sea levels, more water in the atmosphere, more powerful storms, more frequent floods, dreier droughts and worse wildfires. two weeks ago hurricane sandy brought a powerful and tragic reminder that the combination of sea level rise and more powerful storms can be deadly, devastating and extremely costly. hurricane sandy was the only -- only the latest and most dramatic in a series of extreme weather events. over the past two years we've had recordbreaking temperatures , the worst drought in 50 years , major floods, numerous tornadoes and thunderstorms and vast wildfires. this is what global warming looks like. and if we continue to ignore it it will soon look far worse. we should be doing all we can to reduce carbon pollution and slow global warming. but this bill instead tries to s
. the chinese like california, latin americans, florida, mexican buyers prefer texas. americans bought $82 billion in u.s. homes last year. 7 billion from the chinese who now rank number two just behind canadians in real estate investments. california to new york, the chinese are paying cash for high end multi million dollar homes with special kitchens, in-law suites and koi ponds. >> it's been fantastic for the u.s. housing market because we have not suffered as other communities have. in fact, our property values increased. >> 40% of the chinese buy homes as an investment. sometimes two or three at a time in foreclosure states like nevada and arizona. they're not your typical chinese who earn less than $5,000 a year. they're businessmen and communist party leaders. some looking for a high return. others a part-time residence and a stable future for their family. >> it's a sign of their status, you know. you can show off your friends or family that i can buy something overseas. but everybody can -- not everybody can do it. >> the chinese also get more bang for their buck here. $2 million
twitter account. first, the program from the commonwealth club in california and th. >> good evening and welcome. i am your host for today. we also welcome our listening audience and invite everyone to listen to us online. and now it's my pleasure to introduce our distinguished speaker. mark feed man is c.e. ofmente and founder of an organization working to promote encore careers, second acts for the greater good. he spear headed the experience corp one of the biggest service programs engaging people over 55. and the purpose prize which annually provides five 100,000 dollar prices. >> freedman was described as the voice of aging baby boomers for who are sur suing meaningful and sustaining work for later in life. while the "wall street journal" stated he has emerged as a leading voice in discussions nationwide about the changing face of retirement. he's the author of "the big shift: navigating the new stage beyond midlife" published in april 2011 which "the new york times" called an imaginative work with a potential to affect our individual lives and collective future. rec
of ballots are still being counted, 4 million in california alone. sometime today we think we will be officially the winter in florida. -- the winner in florida. as of right now, total turnout and number of voters has increased in colorado, iowa, minnesota, nevada, north carolina, and wisconsin. it looks like it decreased in 35 of 49 battleground states. the total turnout may be higher in 2008 when all the votes are finally counted. as we plan 4, total minority vote share increased to 28%. our coalition turnout, women made up about the same% of the electorate as in 2008. we got if you got% of women voters. for lots of reporting about youth turnout, they continue to turn out and take control of their future. in virginia, we increased our youth percentage. in florida, boating rates increased to 16%, and we got 61% in 2008 and 66% in 2012. african american turnout and support was as high or higher than ever. in ohio, african-americans increased from 11% to 15%. we got somewhere between 9% and 97% in every battle ground state. 71% of latino vote, the highest percentage of latino v
, i know congressman duncan hunter calling from california, he and i are writing a letter. we encouraged our colleagues to sign that letter to the administration, requiring them to comply with the intent of the law. it is unfortunate we have to do that. hopefully we will see some changes in that regard. thank you. >> thank you very much. in march, we are going to hold a jobs fair for veterans. it is interesting. there is an incredible amount of folks that come up. was meeting with franchiser this morning. they have a new initiative to help veterans get inside that business. we are excited by what that means. he mentioned 244,000 claims. do you keep track of the acceptance rate? do you submit them? how often do they make it through the system successfully? >> thank you. it takes so long for them to travel through the system. it is impossible for us to keep an accurate accounting of how many did not. i will tell you that at the board of veterans' appeals, we keep track of the claims that are returned. it breaks down how many claims every year. they did not break them down by the
society organizations which also features the involvement of the university of california san diego. working with the local communities to rethink and refrain the perceptions and understanding of neighborhood security so there are a lot of bottom-up approach is in changing the securities sector. in addition to the high level of policies that we have been discussing such as the initiatives for the police. >> okay. let's take this as our final question and then one more large question to pose to the panel before we break. >> my name is jason, an independent researcher and consultant on issues around policing and the conflict. my question is aimed primarily at bob and i will tweak it for to tunisia. i'm glad he mentioned his paper. it highlighted the problems and the challenges in libya conducting a light footprint and not the kosovo or afghanistan model with hundreds of thousands of people on the ground. and what sort of pushed the democratization and the ssr forward. so i guess the question for bob is what are the considerations to be engaged the conflict, post conflict ssr. what can
that at some point i would like 0 to get back to california. panetta is likely to stay in the post through the budget negotiations and possibly through the spring when they do the next round of budgets. so does that mean he's willing to stay in the pentagon for four more years? for the pool report, panetta told reporters, quote, who the hell knows? my experience in washington is you'd better do this day-to-day. as we reported friday, one of the candidates for panetta's job, when he does go, is actually senator john kerry who is being considered for defense essentially as a consolation prize if he does not get the state department job which is what he truly covets because the assumption right now is, and there's a lot of support for her inside the white house, the president will nominate susan rice to succeed hillary clinton instead. but if rice does get nominated she could have a pretty big confirmation battle on her hands. many republicans, including a guy like south carolina senator lindsey graham who normally ends up confirming a lot of the president's appointments, did in the first ter
. california's 52nd district. california's seventh district. north carolina's seventh district. called on monday was arizona ninth district. so, that is from "the washington times" this morning. the headline, "to west allen, west." he is refusing to concede the house reelection battle. six days later. that is "the washington times" with an update. front royal, virginia, republican, let me go back to you. go ahead. caller: my thought is that i am a republican, but also an american. america voted for obama. we need to pull together as a country. all of the people in the congress and the senate need to pull together and think about what all of the american people need and what is good for this country. if that means that right now republicans have to been in a little bit, they have to do it and fix this budget so that we can move forward as a country. host: taxing the wealthiest americans, is that enough? caller: now, it is not, but we have to make a move forward, working together, and if we do not stop fighting and work together, we will not do anything. host: so, does that mean the demo
and it is a real problem. part of it is the state of california and how it's structured to take claims. but the insurance companies, you know, the point is the cost of workers compensation for our little league as they had to go through the state senate was about 1.5 times the entire compensation of the players and we had a conversation recently with the national football league and i think if you asked them, they would tell you it's a similar program. why is a problem? they think of inheriting a word player played last, the whole thing and nobody objects of course because there are players that have been hurt. if you go back and say you want change this, you and up were dr. cantu is talking about. and then i say wow, we basically have an entire generation we have to deal with because who knows somebody in the southeast conference has perhaps already occurred tmh that isn't going to manifest itself in 15 or 20 years. >> i think you were telling me that the last team that employs the player is the one that picks up all the workers comp. >> and that's not right or wrong. it happens to be
planning for 2016? and scandal bankrupts a california city. officials allegedly scam millions and millions of dollars from taxpayers. one former police chief now wants a lot more. ... what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. aww, not the mall. well, i'll do the shopping... if you do the shipping. shipping's a hassle. i'll go to the mall. hey. hi. y'know, holiday shipping's easy with priority mail flat rate boxes from the postal service. if it fits, it ships anywhere in the country for a low flat rate. yeah, i know. oh, you're good. [ laughing ] good luck! [ male announcer ] priority mail flat rate boxes. online pricing starts at $5.15. only from the postal service. in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history
generation love story and the heroine is modeled on his wife maria. >> she's the barefooted california girl running up the mountainside. >> reporter: kirkland's heart goes out to today's vets. >> these poor guys coming home all beat up and whatever, it just goes on and on. >> reporter: he says world war ii was a very different war. >> when i fought, it was you're fighting to win. you kill the other guy, period. >> reporter: he'll always remember, but he hopes the world never relives it. in vienna, virginia, bruce leshan, 9 news now. >> we've got a link to richard c. kirkland's website on our website >>> now let's get to some breaking news in rockville, maryland. there's a man accused of threatening students at montgomery college. we have the latest on this. >> reporter: right now what we know is a 19-year-old man is in custody. he's actually at rockville city police at this point. they say he allegedly threatened to shoot people on the campus of montgomery college. they say the way it went down is other people overheard him saying he was going to shoot up the campus. they
the rock star treatment in california. why the big celebration? does he need a reason? we'll explain. >> as we head to the break, here's a live look. latest waeth letter and traffic coming up from tucker and julie next. it's 7:26. we'll be back.  >>> back now with this morning's sports breakfast. skipper davy johnson has been named manager of the year. and made their first playoff appearance. this is the second such honor for johnson who turned 70 in january. in 1997 he was named the american leagues top manager. you know what team he was named manager? >> baltimore orioles. >> that's right. >> he got cheated. >> yeah. i thought he would get it. >> if you were the manager for a team 15 years. >> would have been cool the battle of the beltways stopped. >> a's manager had a great season. >> particularly around here. there we go. let's do the weather. cold start to your day. cool afternoon. it is november but the temperatures are just a lite cooler than they should be this time of year. typically upper 50s to 60 and we're going to top out in the upper 40s
stories today. now california congressman darrell issa who oversees d.c. affairs is asking the district and federal national capital planning commission to help decidetaller buildings could be constructed in the city. at a surprise birthday party wednesday for mayor gray, the head of the council's revenue committee, welcomed the new year's long study but with caution. >> what i want to avoid is a crystal city, where you have the monolithic buildings. >> reporter: he suggested new york avenue could be away from neighborhoods. some citizens in the district worry the iconic skyline would be changed by the higher builds. they stress that residential neighborhoods and the city's extensive monumental core would be protected from larger buildings that could change the character of the city. >> if you built a 20-story building, which is going to impact the air, light, things of that nature, would that have a detrimental effect on your quality of life and hence you wouldn't build it. st. elizabeth's, people talk about it all the time. if people do not support the idea, i wouldn't support it eith
as california, they have pledged to start getting equipment crews, etc., here into new jersey and new york and connecticut as quickly as possible. and one of the things that we have been able to do, just to give you a sense of how this is an all hands deck approach, we're able to get c-17's, c-130's, military transport planes potentially to move assets, personnel to speed up the process of getting power up and running as soon as possible. our first priority is water filtration plants and some other critical infrastructure in the state. for that we've got emergency generators. we've got a navy ship that has some helicopters that can help to move assets around the state as well. and so we are going to be working with governor christi's office to identify the critical infrastructure and how we can get what's needed as quickly as possible. a couple other things we are concerned about, one is as power starts coming back on, we want to make sure that people can also get to work. obviously there are a lot of folks in jersey who work in new york, in the city, and in other places where transportati
that are no intensely democrat like new york and california, and you have states that are intensely republican bike texas and alabama there should be a pretty substantial offset there. whatever the reality in that dozen or so 11 or 12 swing states, whatever the reality is the much wanted ground game, the argument that we heard from chicago over and over again, that they might lose on election day but they'll win the election because of early voting doesn't seem to be shaping up that way, that's why we are in the final days of this election in a dead head. megyn: karl rove talked about ohio and early voting and absentee ballots that were requested. he says back in 2008 barack obama his margin of victory -- start with me on the bottom of this graphic you're seeing. obama's margin of victory in 2008 it was 260,000 votes. i'm rounding. he says already in ohio we've seen a swing towards the republican that has wiped out almost all of obama's margin of victory in the early voting or the number of absentee ballots cast for requested. he says, look the democrats 531,000 votes have already been cast or abse
% of the rest of the population. on marriage, latinos were decisive to pass proposition 8 in california, 53% of latinos voted for proposition 8 in california. we are extremely conservative. we also have to understand there's a big difference between the old latino community of 20 or 30 years ago, the cesar chavez era, those in new york and those in the southwest since the u.s. to over parts of mexico, and then the new latino population that is 40% foreign- born, and the rest are children of immigrants, very conservative. when asked about the government they may give answers that are not extraordinary. sometimes we get tangled. we have seen this in this election cycle. on specific issues, if we had a better understanding on where they are coming from and a better understanding of why they're answering the questions that way. with the latino community i believe we lost the latino vote because of immigration. if we would've had a better position on immigration from the get go, from the primary, governor romney would been competitive and he would've been competitive in battleground states where
purchased lottery tickets and basically forgot about them without ever checking the numbers. a california grandmother did the same thing and got a big surprise just in the nick of time. her story is coming up. >> love those story sms. >>> we begin this hour with the dropping temperatures and rising temperatures as people go without power in the northeast. katy tur is live. hope everyone is behaving. >> erica, they are behaving so far. but there is always questions on how long that will last. we're at a station on 44th and 10th. at its peak yesterday, the line stretched down to 18th street. you can't even see how far they went down. that's 26 new york city blocks, which is a remarkable time to wait for gasoline. today it's much of the same. i can't see how long that line goes. it also stretches to 11th avenue. over in new jersey, much of the same. lines that are miles lock in some cases. people waiting for hours on end. the they're not running in to the gas station on fumes, they are literally being pushed by the people behind them because they have completely run out of gas. that's why go
up. thank you. [applause] k you very much,. . i appreciate what you are doing. in california, we have not adopted as much, doctors and twice as you have seen in washington d.c. when we introduce choice, the public schools, the bar will rise because they have to keep up with the charter schools. is that a belief you experienced in washington d.c.? what happened to the public schools and how they performed when that 42% to place? >> it makes a difference. i do not think you can have reform and education without choice. without choice, there will not be an incentive for the bureaucracy to change. it is easy for people to fall into the category of, if you want change, you push for change. i support public schools. i gave teachers the largest raise they ever got, gave the schools more money than they asked for, their test scores and results went down. more money, your kids come and the task force went down. that is because it is like a blob, bureaucracy, like a vacuum cleaner that sucks away the money from the local schools and pours it into the central office. you have all of these cost c
party to a degree. i admit i'm a nate tive california person and i didn't get it. ho can we have this dialogu without screaming at each other. >> c we talk to each other and not scream at one another? >> i hope so. i think when you look at our politics and look at some of the dysfunction in washington and now we have the fiscal cliff issue that is are fwfer congress and i think it's a real open question about whether we're going to have a politically induced recession. we're 40, 50 days away. you see a lot of turbulence in the markets over the next months but this is a political crisis that is going to be bring about an economic crisis if it doesn't get solved. but for the entire history of the country people do profoundly disagree with each other, have been and sometimes don't like each other very much have been able to sit across from each other and do the business of the american people. and that's what the moment requires now. on the question of screaming at each other we should understand that there are tremendous market incentives for people to go on tv and attack each othe
are hard at work on self-driving models. and three states, california, nevada and florida, have already made self-driving vehicles legal as long as the human's sitting in the driver's seat in case of a emergency. that's a good idea. meanwhile, these cars could lose worker productivity. the average commuter spends 250 hours a year behind the wheel. or they could come in handy after you've had a couple cocktails. self-driving trucks could transform the trucking industry. picture long lines of self-driving 18-wheelers traveling down the highway just a few inches apart, no drivers, no stops for gas or food, it could boost fuel efficiency as much as 20%. we're going to need to keep driving ourselves though for a while longer. experts say the driverless cars should be more common in another ten to 15 years when the costs come down. here's the question, how would you feel about riding in a car that drives itself? go to, post a comment on my blog. or go to our post on the "the situation room" facebook page. i don't know if i'd trust a car to drive itself. >> me either. i wo
, and you even have california senator dianne feinstein saying that she wishes the president had not accepted his resignation? >> there's still more we don't know about what happened than what we do know. for one thing, we don't know why the president felt he had to accept it. clearly was a lot of support for david petraeus on capitol hill. and in the executive branch. anyone who is that big a superstar, anyone who's that prominent is going to have a few detractors. david petraeus, both at the pentagon and as cia director had been seen as someone extraordinarily talented. senator feinstein has said since the resignation she really thought his command of the intelligence was second to none. and while we're farther away from 9/11, obviously, every day, people still feel within the executive branch and in the intelligence world, the intelligence communities on capitol hill that we have to have a full-court, all-out effort to deal with threats around the world and general petraeus has been, for a long time, a central part of that. >> you have to wonder about the timing here. i mean,
for the landslide reelection of california governor in 2006. before that a top political advice sor in the white house of george w. bush. he attended the university of delaware from 1988 to 1993. david plouffe crossed paths in schmidt in the late 1980's. he completed his political seasons degree and finned two years ago. he has completed two presidential bids. he was appointed as a senior advice sor to the president in the white house in 2011. he attended is the marks high school before serving in a wide viret of state and national political campaigns. i'm going to ask the two speakers this evening to speak and i had to decide who is going to go first and i decided to use a standard that anyone this this audience could mean and that is whoever has won the most recent presidential election gets to speak first. i think that's the fair enough thing to do so please welcome david plouffe and steve schmidt to the university of delaware. [applause] >> thank you for joining thus evening. it's great to be back where steve and i had our interest in politics fostered and have such great memories of the uni
illinois and california and are largely redistricting gains. but republican still control the house. what would you say was the democrats' message this election cycle, in terms of the issues are policy? they talked about republican extremism but, what is the strong message that the congressional level? it was two-pronged. one, medicare, and two, the ryan budget. medicare is one of the examples , and the right and budget shows different priorities, and republican parties are wrong. that message did not really .orke it was not a decisive win, certainly at the house level, for that message. my editor mentioned this to me as i was going out the door last night. we had three major house special elections over the last couple of years. one in pennsylvania, mark critz won that one, one in new york when chris lee, he of sending photographs, left office in upstate new york, was replaced by democrat, and the third when the arizona seat opened up after congresswoman giffords stepped down after that horrible shooting, she was replaced by congressman barber. the democrats won all three of those specia
yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. boxer: mr. president, i'm going to be very proud to support amendment 2985. i think it has to do with our military readiness. i think it has to do with our national security. and i think the fact that we have this opportunity is commendable, and i want to thank senator udall for it. striking section 313 is important because that section harms d.o.d.'s ability to diversify its fuel supplies by developing and using effective alternative fuels. now, you know, lots of colleagues can come down here and proclaim thi this isn't important or it is important. you know what? i want to listen to the d.o.d. themselves and what they say. there was an armed forces press service news report in july 2012. and this is what they said: and i quote -- "smart investing and less reliance on petroleum-based fuels will help ensure an agile, lethal and adaptable combat force and ultimately national security. " so, mr. president -- mr. president, i was distraught when i heard that the armed services committee by one vote put in this
slides in california. we could have other disasters, wildfires. just overinsure yourself so you can exhale that if something terrible does happen, at least you certainly have that as a back up plan. >> heather: cash in your pocket and a generator. >> have a generator. have cash in your pocket 'cause you never know when you're going to need it. make sure you keep those friendships. don't burn any of the friendships 'cause you might need to call them up and say, do you got a sofa? keep that in mind. >> heather: gregg is sitting next to me, he's all too familiar with a generator because he's been using a generator off and on. >> gregg: for six days. >> heather: thank you very much, ed, we appreciate it. thank you. >> thanks for having me. >> gregg: the trick is most of the generators run on gasoline. well, you got the long gas lines. knives one for two hours. fortunately, i stock piled in gas cans ahead of time. so i was in pretty good shape. but nevertheless, you got to keep refilling the generator. >> heather: you just managed to get power back on. >> a couple of hours ago, yeah. tha
other banks this year. two in california, one in washington state. he allegedly shot and seriously wounded a police officer who spotted him running out of there after that robbery number one. in judging from an eyewitness account many the rexburg standard journal, the robbery could have gotten uglier. the suspect became agitated when it took too long to get the money out of the vault. he told the victims about shooting the police officer and ordered everyone in the vault, slammed the door and he ran off. $70,000 in reward are offered up for this guy, this ak-47 bandit described as 25 to 40 years old. 5'10" and stocky. if you recognize him, call police, call fbi. >>> the family court judge in texas caught on videotape beating his teenager daughter with a belt has been reinstated to the bench. he is william adams. he was suspended a year ago, with pay, after that video rant went viral -- not a rant. it was a video that went viral on you tube showing him abusing his 16-year-old daughter. this was back in 2004. this happened in the small gulf coast town called rockport. we want to warn
, california. you talk about a place called h2. >> another new hotel started by the same group that runs a five star hotel. their rates under $200 a night. they are leading the scene with their eco-friendly approach. they are gold leaf certified. there's a bike sharing program. also a filtered water bar. >> what is that? what does eco friendly mean? >> in a hotel you're looking at basically gold leaf certified standard and things like the water bar. you can fill up on site. >> lots of recycling programs. >> vermont is a beautiful place to visit. you have a hotel there. >> this is a great find actually. what we love here, if you're looking for a luxury farm stay hard to beat this one. rates start at $155 a night. we talked a lot in the country as farm to table is the new vogue. this is farm though tell. set on 1400 acre farm which is cool and leading to sustainable practices. you can learn how to make butter and even go looking for mushrooms. >> you can go make butter? >> yes. >> butter and bacon makes everything good. >> how do you determine hotel trends? what your looking for? >> we reviewed 1
and bigger government. california's lesson, all they do is raise taxes on the rich and don't solve their problems. we don't want america to become like california. >> will liberal democrats in the house, donna, go along with the president if he significantly makes changes, cuts spending for example for medicare and medicaid? >> 60% of the american people, wolf, believes that we should raise taxes on the wealthiest americans. we've had this debate now for many, many months, many, many years on what conservatives want and what so-called tea party republicans want. liberals are going to push their agenda. they are going to fight hard for their agenda. we're not going to set aside our goals, our policies simply because the republicans lost. they lost. and it's important that -- >> donna, they still retain the majority in the house of representatives. and there aren't enough democrats in the senate to beat back a filibuster. >> wolf, we're going to fight for our causes. we may lose. we won more than 57% of the senate seats out there. i mean, we got a lot of popular votes out there. we'r
. he adores this little boy who is growing up with multiple people who love him. california is about to pass a law making it legal for somebody to have three parents with all the different arrangements. if you have a step father who wants to adopt you had a biological father and mother, annie permutation of that, why can we not think about that? hillary clinton said it takes a village, and traditionally you have lots of family members. if you have more people in a child's live to love them, that is a good thing. >> thank you for that. now, let's get to the questions. please identify yourself if you would when you ask your question. i think we have somebody right here. >> i am the chief of staff to a member of congress. i have three children. i was a single parent for 16 years until two years ago when i got married. that was one thing i did not notice come up in the conversation. talk about marriage and families. i do agree there are lots of similarities in terms of the desire both men and women to parent and be there. i think one of the elements of our society is taking care of singl
good morning, blythe danner. hi, blythe danner. >> that's very nice. i'm out in california right now. it is early for me. how are you doing? >> stephanie: i'm good. i know i spoke to you on the red carpet once somewhere and i spoke to your daughter, gwyneth paltrow and i said you'll never know who i interviewed. blythe danner. she went along with the joke. >> i'm very happy. i came to fame as being gwyneth's mom which is fine with me. >> stephanie: and much more. how are things out on the campaign trail. why are you so motivated this time around? >> so excited. out connecting with people. listening to what they had to say about how they are -- their kids have been working so hard. i can't get over the kids -- the field offices and they're so smart and they've just got -- they were such a big help to me. i think first as a woman and then as a mom and a grandmother i just -- i can't imagine how anybody could not vote for our president. when you think about what he has done, how much he's accomplished. i said
, places like southern california and the seattle area where boeing -- and also in missouri where they build some of the military aircraft. but it's the minority of the states in the country. and the notion that this spreads all over the place is not borne up by the few actual surveys that have been done. the pentagon was forced to do some years ago a study on subcontracting, and they found that these main areas where the prime contracts were also received many of the subcontracts. so i think there is more of a concentration of pentagon spending than would be suggested. and then in the areas like virginia where senator mccain, senator kelly ayotte of new hampshire, senator lindsey graham of south carolina, you know, took the scare tour and talked about shipbuilding, talked about military bases, talked about defense consulting firms in northern virginia, um, that argument didn't fly in the elections even though they tried to pin these potential effects on president obama. he carried virginia. and i think the reason for that is that the potential effects were not as deep as advertis
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